April Showers Bulletin Board

April is here and time to switch out the bulletin board again.  We seem to be getting our fair share of rain and the fruit trees are in full  bloom.  I know  some places are still getting snow so I don’t really have a right to complain about the rain.   When looking for this month’s bulletin board project, I saw  several variations of paper flowers on Pinterest.  I happen to have a  supply of colored computer paper that would make colorful flowers for the traditional saying “April Showers Bring May Flowers.”  I was able to adapt one of the flowers to a version that used the materials I have on hand;  paper and tape.  The flowers are simple enough that my older students in the Lifeskills program were able to complete them along with my younger general education students.  My only problem is that the students want to bring them home for their mothers so I had trouble getting them to leave them for the bulletin board.  This is what the board is looking like so far.  We made the directions and shared them on Storykit.  It is still a good exercise to have the students record the directions.  Their voices  were removed here before posting  because of our school privacy requirements.  Directions for flowers on the bulletin board.

 

April Bulletin Board

 

The Never Ever Dinner Plate for the Development of Negation

You may remember in the original posts of this blog,  I wrote about using a push-in model of therapy with Kindergarten students using table games to teach concepts that were measured on the The Boehm Test of Basic Concepts.   For those of you who are unfamiliar with this test, The Boehm Test of Basic Concepts is a norm-referenced, standardized test of fifty common language concepts for children in Kindergarten through second grades.  The concepts are important for following classroom directions and when acquiring math skills.    Children with language delays, 2nd language learners, and those with lack of preschool experience benefit from direct instruction on these.  The vocabulary section on this blog  has some of the games that we developed and adapted.  If you are interested in researching back to the original posts just put Concept Groups in the search bar and you can see how a year of school lesson planning went.  I  still use  the same activities so they have held up over the test of time.

One of the Activities, “The Never Ever Dinner Plate”  needed some refreshing.  My sets are looking a bit worn after 5 years.   The directions are in the  vocabulary section but  you still need to do quite a bit of work  finding  the clip art and collecting  it together.   This can be daunting when you don’t have much time and you are not sure of its true value.  I decide to make a new set and  preview it here so you could see what it actually is.  This game/activity  was used to teach the negatives (never, not), the concepts of match, full, half, and categories of food.  It is also good for talking about a balanced diet if you have a nutrition program or theme.  It was used in our Lifeskills program for that purpose.

The original game was played like this:  Each child was given a  plate mat and 3 pictured food items that match the outlines of the foods on the plate.  I make a set of plates for each table so that each child will have a different plate.  I made the meals balanced so dairy, vegetables, fruit, proteins, and grains are represented. There are also a set of non food items  for each table group.  These are items a child would never eat.  The cards, including the nonfood items, are mixed and placed face down in rows in the center of the table.  Students take turns flipping one card over on their turn to see if it matches a food item on their plate. If it does they can place it on their plate. If it doesn’t they turn the card back over. If it’s a non food item, emphasize that children “never” eat it. It is “not” food.  The nonfood item is then flipped back over.  They are basically foil cards.  While you are playing you can also discuss categories of food and if their plate is ½ full empty etc.   The game is over when one of the children is able to fill their plate with the proper food items.  I have them swap plates and they are always eager to do it again.  There is usually a lot of discussion about what they do like and don’t like to eat.   Here is a preview that you can use with 2 students to test it out:  dinner plate preview PDF.   The full sett of 10 plates is avaialble at TPT.

Never Ever Dnner Plate Preview

Shamrock Bulletin Board

March is here again and it is time to find a new project for the bulletin board.  I looked into the supply closet and found coffee filters left from someone elses project.  This looked like a possibility for inexpensive fun.  I started looking for a shamrock pattern.  I was disappointed to find the die cut pattern was too big for my needs. Then the kindergarten teacher came to my rescue.  She pointed out it was easy to make a shamrock from hearts.  Even though I couldn’t find a shamrock, I found 3 sizes of die cut hearts.  The plan was coming together.  It would be easy to get this project ready because I already have all the materials.
I saw a project that used water based markers and a spray bottle of water. The water made the markers run into interesting designs. I thought the students would enjoy experimenting with that. They could glue the hearts on top of the colored coffee filters and it would look like stained glass. It would add some color to the board. I found a simile that worked well with the shamrocks;  A best friends is  like a four leaf clover, hard to find and  lucky to have.  This gave an opportunity to talk about Similes with my older students.  The younger students  worked on  following  directions and talking about St. Patrick’s Day.   This is what it is looks  like so far.  More Shamrocks will be added as they get completed.  The directions have been uploaded for sharing on Storykit.

Have fun  and have a Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

stained glass shamrock

Social Skills and The Size of the Problem

The need for social skills groups continues to grow at the elementary school where I teach.   We had enough students to form two groups this school year.  One group is made primarily of second graders and the other fourth and fifth graders. The counselor and I teach these classes together.
We have used  Leah Kuypers The Zones of Regulation® (www.zonesofregulation.com) and Michelle Garcia Winner’s Social Thinking® materials for our lesson planning.  Recently we have worked on identifying emotions and how they fall into the 5 zones.  For a brief overview, the Zones are 5 color coded signs that rank from the lowest blue zone of low alertness which relate to being calm,  or tired to the red zone of heightened alertness which relates to feelings such as anger or fear. You can  click on the web sites to obtain more explicit information.

Size of problem

These colors and zones can also be used when talking about the size of a problem. Students determine if a problem is at the lowest level which would be a glitch in our day or at the highest level a crisis difficult to correct. Other problems may fall somewhere in between. When compared with the zones of regulation students  can see if the emotional reaction is appropriate to the problem. This also leads to talking about possible solutions.
When starting this unit, I found it difficult to find appropriate scenarios for the students to rate. They came up with a few on their own but typically do not think of the full range. you would be surprised at how much comes in as being a crisis.  I created 26 cards with written scenarios.  I added another four blank cards that if drawn the student would make up their own. The scenarios are ones that are common to students. I used  Ned’s head for drawing out cards.  Ned’s head is a good way to add humor to the situation and remind students that they may be  thinking and seeing from one perspective inside their head. They can step out to see another perspective and problem solve.  Here are a sample of the cards.  You can down load them and test them out.  12 size of the problem.   The full set are here.

Ned

Target Antonyms

January sure has gone fast.  Here we are a week away from February.  We are coming to the end of a grading period so I am busy writing progress reports.  I am a bit behind because of other meetings.   I am sure you can all relate to that.  We have a new software program which makes it a little harder.   The paper work has been a bit of a challenge this year.

It is getting  harder  to be creative with the bulletin board lately.  I stayed with my theme of antonyms for February.  I looked in my cupboard and  noticed that I have a large supply of straws on hand.  Valentines Day brings out the cupid in all of us so I decided to make arrows.  It helped that we have die cuts for hearts available. The die cut makes a heart as an outline and a smaller heart to be pushed out of the center.  We used the smaller hearts to make the point of the arrow and used a folded rectangle for the feathered end.  The students wrote a word on the arrow head and the opposite word on the white paper to match.  It doesn’t look like the words are visible in the picture. This is the beginning of our project.  I will post updates as we go.  The students are making directions as usual.  However, we are regulated for voices as well as visual images so I can not post my story kit  directions until we are done and I can remove the child audio.  This is what it is looking like.  Here is the Storykit link to the directions: arrow directions

IMG329

Don’t Fall Through the Ice

This is our first week back from the holiday break. Some of us are in the grips of winter.  Baby its cold out there!  It seemed appropriate to go with a winter theme  and cold things.  I dug into my archives and brought out my version of “Don’t Fall Through the Ice”.  This activity has been in the vocabulary section and there are written instructions that can be printed out  under the link.  I didn’t include pictures so some of you may have missed it.  As they say a picture is worth a thousand words. The activity is really very simple and made from recycled materials.  I get a lot of use from my coffee cans.  All you need is a wide mouthed container like a coffee container, a large rubber band, paper towels, marbles, and a spinner made from a plastic lid.  The spinner has the words, one, couple, few, and several.  The marbles are placed in a container of water.  The paper towel is stretched across the mouth of the container and held by the rubber band.  Students take turns spinning the spinner, taking the corresponding amount of marbles from the water, and placing them on top of the paper towel.  Eventually the water will weaken the paper towel and the marbles will fall through.   I used this activity as a reinforcement for  students during therapy or as a group activity to work on the concepts of amount.  I have table groups play and then compare the number of marbles they put on top before they fall through.  In addition to the spinner words you can talk about the concepts of wet/dry, weak/strong, and most/ least.

Ice game

Pop the Pig Game Adaptation

IMG313 (1)This is the time of year when a lot of games are selling for good prices and you may be wondering which ones are good for therapy.   I have adapted Pop the Pig recently.  It really only needed a communication board to add the structure I need.   I use it with students who are working on making basic comments such as I have ______, and I want______.  It is also possible to work on descriptive vocabulary such as size, colors and amounts.   We also work on turn taking and becoming aware of another student’s turn and when they are finished.  The game is really pretty simple.  Students roll the die to choose a colored hamburger.  The student then looks at the bottom to  see how many times they press the pig’s head so it will munch on the hamburger placed in the mouth.  Pressing on the head inflates the rubber tummy until the belt pops open.  It isn’t as dramatic as the advertisement indicates.   However my students seem to enjoy this game and it provides a lot of repetition.  I have them make comments for every turn they take.  It is also good game for general reinforcement.  If you find one at a good price, pick it up.

Candy Cane House Bulletin Board

December goes so fast before the break  there isn’t much time to get a bulletin board together.  Our school has decided to decorate a winter wonderland that will be left up for the beginning of January.  I try to remain culturally sensitive so decided a gingerbread house would do.  We are still working on adding more candy canes.  I thought you might also enjoy this project so I posted it.    I came across these candy canes on pinterest that are the perfect thing for quick decorating and can remain up after the break.  I also had all the materials on hand. They only took about 15 minutes and all of my students enjoyed making them from the youngest to my 5th graders.  The stripes seem to appear like magic.  The directions provide opportunities to practice  words such as center,  corner, straight, edge, center, square, and tube.  The older students formulated the directions and recorded them for the younger ones. My articulation students practiced using their clear speech.  It is amazing how many goals  can be worked on with such a simple project.

Gingerbread house

The directions for the candy canes are in Storykit as usual.

http://iphone.childrenslibrary.org/cgi-bin/view.py?b=hkqfjvaeaipxy3n2z7lw

More Fun With Angry Turkeys

Last year at about this time I made turkey bean bags and used them in a toss game.   I brought them out again for another round of Angry Turkeys.  This  game is made from toilet paper rolls and coffee can lids.  I simply covered the toilet paper rolls to give them color.   I improved it a bit by making the  green pigs from paper rolls cut in half.  I just printed  clip art of a pig and taped it to the paper roll.  This is what it looked like.photo

For the activity at school, I used Sounding board.  It is a free app by Ablenet  that allows you to make a communication board with pictures.  I wasn’t able to  share it  so  used the same pictures and converted it to Storykit.  Here is the Storykit version.  http://iphone.childrenslibrary.org/cgi-bin/view.py?b=nma32raqfbftw6v5g23r

The directions for the Turkey Bean bags are here.

The students placed the pigs in the proper spots while reading the story.  They then all tossed a turkey on the count of 3. They always want to do it again. I love  activities that are self reinforcing. photo (1)

Leaf Turkey Bulletin Board

November is a really short month for me.  After the Veteran’s Day holiday we have conferences.  We then have Thanksgiving  break.  I usually don’t have time to do an elaborate bulletin board  but after seeing the leaf turkeys on Pinterest I couldn’t pass them up.  I happen to have a huge supply of maple leaves from a tree in my yard, and I already had the other supplies.  The pear die from the homonym tree came in handy because I used it for the turkey body.  It was an easy project that could be completed in one session and was good for concept vocabulary development (1st, second, finally, behind, in front, above, below, and together).

This was my model turkey:

IMG303

The directions are on StoryKit as usual. http://iphone.childrenslibrary.org/cgi-bin/view.py?b=ojqxie225jb35gi7lvxz

This is what the bulletin board looked like.  We added the signs for a little humor and to talk about irony and double meanings with the older students.  The signs say ‘Eat Ham”IMG302.

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